Tag Archives: Birds

The Tufted Puffin (Fratercula cirrhata).

The Tufted Puffin (Fratercula cirrhata) is a relatively abundant medium-sized pelagic seabird in the auk (Alcidae) family found throughout the North Pacific Ocean. It is one of three species of puffin that make up the Fratercula genus and is easily recognizable by its thick red bill and yellow tufts.

The Tufted Puffin was first described in 1769 by German zoologist Peter Simon Pallas. Its generic name is derived from the Latin Fratercula ‘little brother’ and the specific epithet, cirrhata ‘tufted’. Since it may be more closely related to the Rhinoceros Auklet than the other puffins it is sometimes placed in the genus Lunda.

Tufted Puffins form dense breeding colonies during the summer reproductive season from British Columbia, throughout southeastern Alaska and the Aleutian Islands, Kamchatka, the Kuril Islands and throughout the Sea of Okhotsk. While they share some habitat with Horned Puffins (F. corniculata), the range of the Tufted Puffin is generally more southern. They have been known to nest in small numbers as far south as the northern Channel Islands, off southern California. However, the last confirmed sighting at the Channel Islands occurred in 1997.
Tufted Puffins typically select islands or cliffs that are relatively inaccessible to predators, close to productive waters, and high enough that they can take to the air successfully. Ideal habitat is steep but with a relatively soft soil substrate and grass for the creation of burrows.
During the winter feeding season, they spend their time almost exclusively at sea, extending their range throughout the North Pacific and south to Japan and California.

Tufted Puffins feed almost exclusively on fish, which they catch by diving from the surface. Adults may also feed on squid or other invertebrates. Feeding areas can be located far offshore from the nesting areas. Puffins can store large quantities of small fish in their bills and carry them to their chicks.

Tufted Puffins are preyed upon by various avian raptors such as Snowy Owls, Bald Eagles and Peregrine Falcons, and mammals like the Arctic Foxes. Foxes seem to prefer the puffin over other birds, making the bird a main target. Choosing inaccessible cliffs and entirely mammal-free islands protects them from terrestrial predators while laying eggs in burrows is effective in protecting them from egg-scavengers like gulls and ravens.

Collectors Notes:

Date of issue: October, 16, 2010

Designer: Vladimir Marmiloff

Catalog number: 2 (28)

 

The Northern Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes).

 Stamps of Commander IslandsThe Northern(Winter) Wren.

In an oval Vitus Bering’s portrait

The Winter Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes), also known as the Northern Wren, is a very small bird, a member of the mainly New World wren family Troglodytidae. It is the only one of nearly sixty species in the family that occurs in the Old World; in Anglophone Europe it is commonly known simply as the Wren, and is the originator of the name. It is noteworthy among songbirds both because of its long and complex songs and because it is one of the few passerine species that has a distribution spanning both North America and Eurasia. It is also highly polygynous, an unusual mating system for passerines.

Collectors Notes:

Date of issue:   Semptember, 1st, 2010

Designer:   Vladimir Marmiloff

Catalog number:   1